The Limits of Community and the Future of Going Gradeless

To what extent is grading an unexamined process that is part of a system that’s less about learning and more about sorting, stigmatizing, and sickening our children in pursuit of a perfection that is neither attainable nor healthy?

Teachers Going Gradeless

This is the second in a series of posts exploring teaching and learning in the de-graded and de-tested language arts classroom. Read the first post here

Teaching can be a lonely profession. Even though I come into contact with 120 people every day, most of the interactions are asynchronous. The relationships I have with my students are authentic, and I do my best to build reciprocity and trust, but I’m in a different place than them. The relationships I form with students are also circumscribed by centuries of hierarchical teacher/student dynamics.

On the other hand, my peers and I are on equal footing. But the demands of the job keep a tight leash on what we talk about and when we talk about it. When I meet with my fellow 7th grade English teachers, for instance, we’re expected to follow the district’s meeting template. And when it comes to…

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